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"training is getting better - on Sunday,I became Croatian Champion in the mix doubles with an average 180 in qualifying rounds, 204 in the semifinals & finals 214.I was soooooo happy that day.....work pays off!," writes Croatian bowler Daniela Funda, who attended my camp in December in Zagreb as well as did a 2-day lesson and fit change Feb 16 & 17 2013.  She was averaging 165 at the time.
 

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An Easy Way to Measure Repeatability in Your Players PDF Print E-mail
Written by Joe Slowinski   
Sunday, 18 March 2007
With a stopwatch, a coach can collect a great deal of data on bowler consistency.  From the amount of time taken in a pre-shot routine to the consistency of the approach, timed data collection will help you be a better coach. 

USING a STOPWATCH to COLLECT

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BOWLER REPEATABILITY DATA

Rationale: Using a stopwatch is an easy method to collect data on consistency in four areas: (1) pre-shot routine; (2) set-up; (3) approach; (4) ball speed.  Specifically, what is the time that a bowler needs to complete each of those phases and is it consistent, shot-by-shot?  Consistency can be measured in all of these four areas to determine the overall commitment to each shot, from mental game aspects to walking at the same pace and throwing at the same speed, time after time.  In essence, this will allow you to measure the bowler's repeatability.

What you need:

a stopwatch with lap time capabilities.

Where to stand:

You will stand in a position to allow you to see the bowler from pre-approach to the foul line.  Specifically, you will capture the time from start (pre-approach) to finish, capturing lap times to enable you to review the specific time needed for each bowler to complete each phase.

How to collect the data:

(1) Start the timer as soon as the bowler picks-up their bowling ball.  This will provide you with the specific time dedicated to pre-shot routine off of the lane and before the shot.  Measure both the commitment to the first shot as well as the second  (lap time # 1);

(2) As soon as the bowler moves toward the approach, hit the lap time button.  This segment will provide you with the amount of time to set-up and visualize (lap time # 2);

(3) As soon as the bowler starts their approach, hit the lap time button.  This time is the amount of time to take the approach (lap time # 3);

(4) When the ball passes the foul line, hit the lap time button (lap time # 4).

(5) Finally, hit the stop time button when the ball hits the pins (lap time # 5).

How to analyze the data:

You will need to subtract to calculate the specific time for each phase.  Then, you can look at the average and the range of high to low time.  This will illustrate how consistent the bowler is at each phase during each shot.  The data will reveal a great deal about where the bowling is in regard to setting the stage to be consistent.  And, to become a great or good bowler, an individual needs to be consistent.  The data in the table below will allow you to measure consistency in each phase.  What is the average time and the standard deviation.  You want their to be little difference between all of your data collected over ten shots.

NOTE: Average ball speed is calculated by the following: 40.91/t (MPH)   or   65.45/t  (KPH) where t is the # of seconds the ball travels from the foul line to the head pin.

  SHOT 1 SHOT 2 SHOT 3SHOT 4  SHOT 5SHOT 6  SHOT 7 SHOT 8 SHOT 9 SHOT 10 AVG/RANGE
 PRE-SHOT           

 SET-UP/

VISUALIZATION

           
 APPROACH (GAIT)           
 BALL SPEED           
Last Updated ( Sunday, 18 March 2007 )
 
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